Spotlight: MORGAN HAS GONE !

Tumut and Adelong Times (NSW : 1864 – 1867; 1899 – 1950), Thursday 20 April 1865, page 2 MORGAN. MORGAN HAS GONE! A week ago the name carried terror and alarm with it ; people did not know whether or not any night they might not be shot down in the dark and coldly murdered ; men of wealth were arranging to sell their property, and leave a colony where lawless out-rage and crime were so rampant ; persons who had thoughts of settling amongst us and giving us the benefit of their labor, their capital, and their skill, abandoned … Continue reading Spotlight: MORGAN HAS GONE !

Spotlight: Reward Notice for Thomas Jeffries

Thomas Jeffries may have referred to himself as “The Captain”, but he earned himself a more notorious nickname: The Monster. In his brief bushranging career, the former flagellator committed acts of robbery, murder, rape and cannibalism. Such was his reputation that after he was captured, Matthew Brady planned to break him out of Launceston Gaol just so he could have the satisfaction of lynching Jeffries himself. The reward for Jeffries and his companions (Hopkins and Perry) would have been adequate inducement for people to turn them in, but bushrangers always proved much harder to catch than what the authorities seemed … Continue reading Spotlight: Reward Notice for Thomas Jeffries

Spotlight: THE LATE SIR FREDERICK POTTINGER

Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Chronicle (NSW : 1860 – 1870), Saturday 15 April 1865, page 2 THE LATE SIR FREDERICK POTTINGER, BART. In the prime of life—but 34 years of age—and in the midst of a career of usefulness, has died Sir Frederick Pottinger, as genial hearted, affectionate, and charitable a man as ever lived. Sir Frederick on his way from Forbes to Sydney about a month ago, unfortunately was severely wounded by the accidental discharge of his revolver at Wascoe’s “Pilgrim Inn,” Lapstone Hill, on the far-famed and wild Blue Mountains. When able to be removed, he … Continue reading Spotlight: THE LATE SIR FREDERICK POTTINGER

Spotlight: THE CAPTURE AND DEATH OF MORGAN.

Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 – 1954), Thursday 13 April 1865, page 6 THE CAPTURE AND DEATH OF MORGAN. We take the following detailed account of the termination of the career of this ruffian from the Ovens and Murray Advertiser, of 11th April : — Daniel Morgan, who for two years has been the terror of the neighboring colony of Now South Wales, from the frequency and malignity of his bloody outrages, made his first attempt at robbery in Victoria at Mackinnon’s station, on the Little River, on Wednesday, the 5th inst., and lay dead, shot through the body by … Continue reading Spotlight: THE CAPTURE AND DEATH OF MORGAN.

Spotlight: Capture of Mary Cockerill

Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (Tas. : 1816 – 1821), Saturday 12 April 1817, page 2 On Thursday returned to Town a small party of Capt. NAIRN’S Company of the 46th Regt. who were lately sent in quest of the Bush Rangers; the following particulars of their pursuit we lay before our Readers:— After a diligent search in the woods the party at Jericho perceived Michael Howe, accompanied with a Native Black Girl, named Mary Cockerill, with whom Howe cohabited. On the approach of the party Howe darted into a thicket, and effected his escape, after firing at the … Continue reading Spotlight: Capture of Mary Cockerill

Spotlight: Portrait of James Sutherland

James Saunders was born at Big River, (Ouse). At 18 months old, James was left by his father with a woman at Perth. This woman raised him until he was 5 years old and he was given the name Sutherland. He was then fobbed off on a woman at Evandale, who looked after him until he was 11. James was then kicked out and left to his own devices. He tried to make his way back to Perth, but was arrested and tried under the vagrancy act. He was sentenced to 3 months in gaol. When he got out of … Continue reading Spotlight: Portrait of James Sutherland

Spotlight: The Port Arthur Bushrangers

Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 – 1857), Tuesday 5 April 1842, page 3 THE PORT ARTHUR BUSHRANGERS. The report that Westwood, or as he is generally called “the notorious Jacky Jacky,” has absconded from Port Arthur with six of his Sydney comrades and three of the Port Arthur “old hands,” has occasioned no trifling alarm in the minds of those who may be subjected to their visitation. Bad as are many of the individuals at that settlement, those who have absconded are perhaps the worst of the whole number — men, who are regardless of consequences, and who imagine … Continue reading Spotlight: The Port Arthur Bushrangers