Spotlight: Letter to the Editor, Concerning the Jewboy Gang (1841)

Sir,—Considering it a duty due to the public I beg leave to request that you will permit me through the medium of your paper, to enquire how it was that the party of mounted police, headed by sergeant Lee, who were in pursuit of the notorious bushrangers “Marshall,” “Ruggy,” “Shay,” “Davis” and “Chitty” on or about the 14th December last, allowed them to escape their notice when they were so close that they captured three of their horses.

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Spotlight: The Bushrangers, Windsor (1830)

The Windsor Police have received the most accurate information of Donohoe and his accomplice. It has been stated, by one reputed to have been in their confidence for a considerable time, that Donohoe is not connected with the notorious Underwood, but that one John Walmsley, an absentee from an iron gang, was introduced to his notice by the government servants of a gentleman at Mulgoa, on whose farm are shipmates of both the desperadoes, and that their connexion so commenced.

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Spotlight: Brady robs Haywood; Jeffries at large; Execution of McCabe (1826)

On Saturday evening Brady and his party, appeared at Mr. Haywood’s, and robbed him of a large quantity of tea, sugar, tobacco, rum, and flour, besides all the bedding and wearing apparel in the house. Brady alone was mounted on horseback. On coming up, he said, “Mr. Haywood, I am Brady.” He desired him to be under no apprehension of being hurt on account of the late execution of Broadhead, who, he said, was not a bushranger. He wanted provisions only and after remaining about 3 hours, they departed, taking with them 2 horses, besides the one Brady had mounted, to carry their plunder.

Continue reading Spotlight: Brady robs Haywood; Jeffries at large; Execution of McCabe (1826)

Spotlight: Notoriety (Geelong, 1853)

Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 – 1856), Wednesday 5 January 1853, page 2 NOTORIETY. — Dragged from the sinks of crime into public notice, Captain Melville and his associate Roberts stand prominently forward, challenging notoriety. Every examination adds to the sum of their crime, and rumour, busily at work, invests them with fictitious attributes, to satisfy a morbid craving after depravity, the more palatable because the more debased, and having but one saving quality — that of unmistakable courage unmixed with cruelty. The poor wretch who pilfers a pocket handkerchief, and slinks away to some den, is looked … Continue reading Spotlight: Notoriety (Geelong, 1853)

Spotlight: News from the Interior (1840)

On Sunday last, the 20th instant, information was received by Mr. Day, who fortunately for the inhabitants of the Hunter’s River districts happened to be here, that the bushrangers had visited a station of Sir Francis Forbes, distant about three miles from this place, and bailed up the persons there in order that a report might not reach Muswell Brook, and kept them so until nearly sundown, when they departed.

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Spotlight: SHOWING HOW BRADY SERVED MR. FLEXMORE ON BOXING DAY by Mr. J. E. Calder

“Good morning, Mr. Flexmore.”

“Good morning,” replied the other a little stiffly.

” Do you know who I am, Sir?” said the spokesman of the party, not quite relishing the curtness of Flexmore’s reply.

“No, I don’t,” said the other rather gruffly, for he had a little of John Blunt about him at times,

” Then I take leave to inform you that I am Brady, the bushranger, who you have heard of before, for I’ve robbed above half the settlers of the country already, and mean to rob the other half before I’ve done with them; and now, Sir, I’ll trouble you for your money.”

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Spotlight: Hunter’s River Bushrangers (1840)

The Rubicon is past – and human blood is now shed by one of the most lawless gangs of bushrangers that ever infested the Hunter. Blood, that cries aloud for retribution at the hands of our vacillating government. Blood – yes blood, the first of a long list which it is anticipated, will mark the career of the Hunter’s River bushrangers.

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Spotlight: Bushranging on the Williams (1840)

Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 – 1842), Thursday 10 December 1840, page 2 NEWS FROM THE INTERIOR. BUSHRANGING ON THE WILLIAMS. The bushrangers who were at Newcastle lately, and more recently at Mr. Pilcher’s farm, on the Hunter, have paid us a visit en passant, and now that they have found themselves in every necessary, have left the district for a bold dash somewhere else. On Sunday night last, the 29th ultimo, between nine and ten o’clock, as Dr. McKinlay with a guide, was proceeding towards Mr. Chapman’s, of the Grange, from Mr. Coar’s, of Wallaringa, where he had been … Continue reading Spotlight: Bushranging on the Williams (1840)

Spotlight: EARLY TROUBLES OF THE COLONISTS by J. E. Calder (Pt. 8)

In the epilogue of his biography of Michael Howe, James Calder sets the record straight on some of the falsehoods peddled by other writers, and goes into more detail about some of the other figures that appeared in Howe’s story such as Black Mary and James Geary. He concludes with a reflection on the nature of crime and punishment in colonial Australia, and its impact on crime. Continue reading Spotlight: EARLY TROUBLES OF THE COLONISTS by J. E. Calder (Pt. 8)