BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Eight)

The accounts of these murders, both oral and printed, and the description of them as given in Smith’s evidence are so various, that it would be folly for me to pretend to give the correct version. Putting the odds and ends together I came to the conclusion that a certain squatter made the plan up, that James Griffin did the telegraphing, and the Clarkes and Bill Scott the shooting part. Continue reading BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Eight)

BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Seven)

The Big Tailor gave the alarm at once to the Clarkes who were inside the store. The Clarkes came to the door as the police came up. Constable Reilly, a plucky fellow, was in front and as he rode up Tom Clarke went to him and coolly asked him who he was. Reilly told him he was a policeman. “Well” said Tom Clarke, “take that!” – as he suddenly let fly at him with his rifle. The other two police, the sergeant and the constable then came up and fired in return; Reilly fired a shot or two, and then retreated after his mates, and tried to rally them, but they did not like the smell of it, and so kept at a civil distance, thus enabling the bushrangers to mount their horses and ride away with a spare horse loaded with booty. Not only this, the bushrangers actually took time to light their pipes before riding away! Here are your regimental policemen when in action. Continue reading BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Seven)

Spotlight: Inquest on William Drew and other news (18/10/1817)

On Wednesday sailed the ship Pilot, Captain PEXTON, for Port Jackson, having on board Colonel DAVEY, late Lieutenant Governor of the Colony, Mr. O’CONNOR, Lieut. STEWART, and Mr. WINDER. The following prisoners, lately committed to take their trial before the Criminal Court at Sydney, were sent up in this Vessel:- Collier, Hillier and Watts, the bushrangers; Clarke, Scott and two Crahans, for sheep stealing. A number of evidences on behalf of the Crown also went up in this vessel, amongst whom is Black Mary, a native of this Colony, who some time back was an active guide to the military parties in quest of the bush-rangers. Continue reading Spotlight: Inquest on William Drew and other news (18/10/1817)

Spotlight: Trial of Sam Poo for Wilful Murder (13/10/1865)

John Clough was called, and deposed: I am in the employ of Mr. Plunkett, at Talbragar; I remember the day that constable Ward was shot; I saw the prisoner in that neighbourhood the day after Ward was shot; I was coming through the scrub, and I saw him covering me with a gun; he asked me where I was going, and on my telling him that I was going to Mr. Plunkett’s, he said, “Go on, or I will give you one too,” Pointing to the gun and a pistol that was lying near him on a log. The gun shown me (one that had been cut down in the barrel) is the gun he had; it had a piece of leather near the nipple like that now on the gun; I did not notice the pistol-could not swear it was a pistol; the prisoner was dressed in a serge shirt and corduroy trousers like those worn by the prisoner now; he had a hat like the prisoner’s.

Continue reading Spotlight: Trial of Sam Poo for Wilful Murder (13/10/1865)

Spotlight: The Bushranger Morgan (23/09/1864)

A party of police, consisting of Senior Sergeant Smyth, Senior Constable Baxter, Constables Connor, and Maguire, and a blackfellow named Jimmy Reed, were camped on Sunday night at Dougal’s Swamp, near Keighran’s station. They had just got tea, and were lying in the tent yarning, as is usually done by persons camped out. They had no sentry on guard – that duty being delayed until they “turned in” for the night. Suddenly their discourse was cut short by a volley being fired into the tent amongst them.

Continue reading Spotlight: The Bushranger Morgan (23/09/1864)

Thomas Jeffries: an overview

He was referred to as “the monster”, accused of a string of horrific crimes including murder, infanticide and cannibalism. His reputation was so repulsive that the gentleman bushranger Brady threatened to break him out of prison so he could have the privilege of hanging the villain himself. But was Thomas Jeffries (aka Jeffrey) as bad as he was claimed to be? Continue reading Thomas Jeffries: an overview

Spotlight: Morgan the Bushranger (16 July 1864)

THIS miscreant, emboldened by the impunity with which he has for months past robbed travellers and levied blackmail from the squatters in the Albury district, occasionally diversifying his exploits by burning down a woolshed or destroying a settler’s account books, has added two murders to his crimes. On the 19th ult., he encountered Sergeant Carroll, of Wagga Wagga, about twenty miles from Albury, and several shots were exchanged without effect. During the afternoon of the same day he visited the Roundhill station, belonging to Messrs. Henty, and, after dismounting, put his horse into the stable. There were a number of men about the huts, whom the ruffian, with a revolver in each hand, ordered to go into the carpenter’s shop, and after asking Mr. Watson, the superintendent, if the men got enough rations, ordered him to go and bring four bottles of grog, which were drank; after carousing for hours, Morgan was about taking his departure, when Mr. Watson incautiously made some remark about stolen stirrup irons.

Continue reading Spotlight: Morgan the Bushranger (16 July 1864)

Spotlight: Smith and Brady on Trial (22 October 1872)

James Smith, Thomas Brady and William Happenstein, three men in the garb of bushmen, were charged with robbery under arms, and attempted murder at Wooragee. Mr Superintendent Barclay said that the defendants had been to a certain extent identified by some of the persons who were present when the robberies took place; as, however, they had only been arrested on Saturday afternoon, he would ask for a remand, in order that proper enquiries might be made. Remanded till Monday next. Continue reading Spotlight: Smith and Brady on Trial (22 October 1872)

Spotlight: Norfolk Island (29 October 1846)

Sentinel (Sydney, NSW : 1845 – 1848), Thursday 29 October 1846, page 2 NORFOLK ISLAND. (From a Correspondent of the Sydney Morning Herald ) We have been recently favoured with important intelligence from this island, and as it is but rarely any of the doings of that unhappy spot reach the public ear or eye, we are glad to have it in our power to communicate an account of the late proceedings upon which our readers may fully rely. A more melancholy one can scarcely be imagined, and if to what we now publish we were to add other enormities … Continue reading Spotlight: Norfolk Island (29 October 1846)