BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Eleven)

The fact is the natives are not required in the force. They are considered as only fit to make bushrangers, and many a promising young man has been driven to the bush by police persecutions. Do you suppose that all the young people who have taken to the bush have done so for the sake of robbing and plundering? They are usually disliked by the police and are taken on suspicion for some supposed case, acquitted, and retaken, and they are pointed at until they take the bush in disgust under the mistaken notion of recovering their self-respect. Not many are driven to this, but it is well known that two or three of the most formidable bushrangers took the bush from their self-respect being wounded by some police interference. But it is also a well known fact that many bush natives live by nothing else but rowdyism, and by horse and cattle stealing. There are black sheep in every flock, and I do not exempt my native countrymen, more especially those in the back parts of the country, where they run almost wild. Continue reading BUSHRANGING AND OUR POLICE SYSTEM (Part Eleven)

Spotlight: Britton and Thunderbolt at Gostwyck (07/11/1863)

It has been ascertained that the two men who stuck up a hut at Gostwick are the identical two who escaped from Cockatoo Island some time ago. It appears that after their affray with the police they managed to elude all further pursuit by secreting themselves in a hut belonging to one of Mr. Stitt’s shepherds while he was absent, who upon his return found one of them quietly feasting upon his supper. Continue reading Spotlight: Britton and Thunderbolt at Gostwyck (07/11/1863)

Spotlight: Capture of “Thunderbolt’s” Wife (10 April 1866)

A short time since, a police party, consisting of senior-sergeant Kerrigan, constable Scully, a black tracker, and a volunteer – Norman Baton, went through the New England and Stroud district in search of Ward, alias Thunderbolt, and on Tuesday last, at a place called Pignabarney Creek, about thirty miles from Nundle, they sighted a half-caste woman with horse, saddle, bridle, and swag, and believing her to be Ward’s wife, they asked her where Ward was; she said she was “the captain’s lady,” and Ward had been chased two days previously by the police; that she had since been in search of him with provisions and was unable to find him in the mountains. Continue reading Spotlight: Capture of “Thunderbolt’s” Wife (10 April 1866)

Thunderbolt’s Last Ride

Captain Thunderbolt had established himself as one of the most elusive bushrangers of the 1860s. With a formidable string of robberies to his name, it almost seemed like he would be at large forever, but in May 1870 Thunderbolt’s career came to an end in spectacular fashion at Kentucky Creek. This is the story of that fateful day. Continue reading Thunderbolt’s Last Ride

Spotlight: Thunderbolt’s Popgun; Jewboy’s Shooter

Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 – 1954), Thursday 24 December 1925, page 9 THUNDERBOLT’S POPGUN JEWBOY’S SHOOTER (NOTES BY JAS. R. SCOTT). A very fine collection of firearms and other relics of the bushranglng and pioneering … Continue reading Spotlight: Thunderbolt’s Popgun; Jewboy’s Shooter