Spotlight: Capture of “Thunderbolt’s” Wife (10 April 1866)

A short time since, a police party, consisting of senior-sergeant Kerrigan, constable Scully, a black tracker, and a volunteer – Norman Baton, went through the New England and Stroud district in search of Ward, alias Thunderbolt, and on Tuesday last, at a place called Pignabarney Creek, about thirty miles from Nundle, they sighted a half-caste woman with horse, saddle, bridle, and swag, and believing her to be Ward’s wife, they asked her where Ward was; she said she was “the captain’s lady,” and Ward had been chased two days previously by the police; that she had since been in search of him with provisions and was unable to find him in the mountains. Continue reading Spotlight: Capture of “Thunderbolt’s” Wife (10 April 1866)

Thunderbolt’s Last Ride

Captain Thunderbolt had established himself as one of the most elusive bushrangers of the 1860s. With a formidable string of robberies to his name, it almost seemed like he would be at large forever, but in May 1870 Thunderbolt’s career came to an end in spectacular fashion at Kentucky Creek. This is the story of that fateful day. Continue reading Thunderbolt’s Last Ride

Spotlight: Thunderbolt’s Popgun; Jewboy’s Shooter

Cessnock Eagle and South Maitland Recorder (NSW : 1913 – 1954), Thursday 24 December 1925, page 9 THUNDERBOLT’S POPGUN JEWBOY’S SHOOTER (NOTES BY JAS. R. SCOTT). A very fine collection of firearms and other relics of the bushranglng and pioneering … Continue reading Spotlight: Thunderbolt’s Popgun; Jewboy’s Shooter

Spotlight: Portrait of John Thompson

John Thompson was a member of Captain Thunderbolt’s first gang in 1865. During this time he was working as a bushranger in the gang alongside Mary Ann Bugg, Thomas “The Bull” Hogan and a lad called McIntosh. The gang had been operating since January in the region around the Culgoa and Bokhara rivers when Thompson joined them in February of 1865. Continue reading Spotlight: Portrait of John Thompson